Ford FR9 Engine Update

FORD RACING NOTES AND QUOTES    Gatorade Duel 150 Advance,
February 10, 2010       Daytona International Speedway

After debuting in the Ford Fusions of Matt Kenseth and David Ragan
last fall at Talladega Superspeedway, the FR9 engine is back in action
during Daytona Speedweeks.  Below are some notes on which teams have
the FR9, and what the plan is for the engine throughout the rest of
this week.

*       All teams under the Roush Fenway Racing, Richard Petty
Motorsports,
and Wood Brothers Racing banner ran the FR9 in practice and Daytona
500 qualifying last week, and will use it in Thursday's Gatorade Duel
150 qualifying races.

*       The only Ford team that will run FR9 exclusively all season is
Wood
Brothers Racing and driver Bill Elliott, who is running a limited
schedule in 2010.  A determination on if any other Fords, besides the
21 car, will run the FR9 in the Daytona 500 will be made after the
Duels.

*       Front Row Motorsports and the Latitude 43 team of Boris Said
will
run the 452 engine (previous engine) throughout 2010.

*       All five Fords that competed in the Budweiser Shootout DID NOT
have the FR9.

Doug Yates of Roush Yates Engines spoke between practice sessions on
Wednesday at Daytona International Speedway about the plan for FR9 and
how he feels the engine has performed to this point.

DOUG YATES, Roush Yates Engines - WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON HOW THE
FR9 HAS PERFORMED SO FAR HERE AT DAYTONA?  "We ran the FR9 last fall
at Talladega and were really pleased.  Matt was running second until
the end when we ran out of gas, so we had a shot to win the race, but,
so far, I think we're pretty pleased.  The Wood Brothers had a great
qualifying run and qualified fourth.  They put a lot of effort into
qualifying, so that's what we use as our barometer for how the engine
is and how it's doing.  Saturday night in the Shootout, the guys did
not race the FR9.  They raced the 452 (old engine) and they looked
really strong, and today in the first practice for the qualifying
races tomorrow the engines and cars looked real good.  We're really
optimistic about what we've seen so far.  Of course, we'd like to come
down here and sit on the front row, but that's behind us and now it's
time to go see if we can't win another Daytona 500 like we did last
year with Matt."

WHY NOT RUN THE FR9 IN THE SHOOTOUT?  "Part supply is one thing.  It
takes time to build up an inventory and that's something we've been
trying to really be smart about.  There are economic concerns there
and financial things you have to work through as well, but the other
thing is that the 452 engine - which some refer to as the old engine -
runs really well.  We had a shot to win the race with Greg Biffle and
Kasey Kahne, and Carl led the whole first segment, so we're in a
really good position to be able to go back and forth between the two
engines and try to take our time and make sure that when we do release
it and run it across the board that it is 100 percent bulletproof and
will get the job done."

DOUG YATES -- IS SPEEDWEEKS A LUXURY IN THE SENSE YOU CAN
RUN BOTH ENGINES IF YOU WANT?  "At Speedweeks you really get two
races.  NASCAR allows you to run two engines and by the time the 150s
are over, you'll have about 400 miles on that engine, so that's almost
like running a short race like down here in the summer.  We'll take
those engines back home and diagnose how they look and dissect them to
make sure everything is good.  We're gonna get a chance to run the 500
with the Wood Brothers and get a full race on it.  Right now, we're
sitting on the fence on whether to pull the trigger on racing a couple
more or not, but we'll make that decision after the 150s."

YOU'VE BEEN COMING HERE A LONG TIME.  WHAT'S THE FIRST THING THAT
COMES TO YOUR MIND WHEN YOU DRIVE THROUGH THAT TUNNEL EVERY YEAR?
"The first thought is what a privilege it is to be here.  This is an
historic place.  It's the birthplace of NASCAR and where the France
family had the vision to build this place.  We're all honored to walk
in the gates and from being here as a young boy with my dad, and
watching him build the engine that won Richard Petty's 200th race, and
watching Richard Petty beat Cale Yarborough to the line here in July.
I didn't get to go because I was young, but my dad got to eat lunch
that day with President Reagan, and that was so special for him.  I'll
never forget that the guys who owned Petty's team at the time, they
were so excited they let us stay in their suite down on the beach.
For us, we're kind of at the back of the station wagon, so that was a
really special moment."

YOU WON SOME RACES HERE WITH YOUR DAD AS WELL.  "Those Daytona 500s
that my dad and I have won here are really special.  In '92 with
Davey, '96 with Dale and 2000 with Dale, those are all special times
and there for a while it was every election year we got a 500 win.  It
came harder, but it also came often and now I kind of forgot how that
tasted until last year with Matt.  To be in Victory Lane with Jack
Roush for his first 500 win was something really special, and I'll
never forget him telling me, 'Wow, I didn't realize how big of a deal
that was and now I do.  Thank you.'  That was really cool because
since my dad isn't here at the race track, Jack kind of fills that
role for me and I really want to see him have a lot of success and see
us together have a lot of success.  I love this place.  It's one of
those tracks where when you come away you can be so frustrated, but
you can't wait to have another shot at it.  It is the Daytona 500.  It
is our Super Bowl, and I think people need to realize how special it
is."

WHILE YOU HAVE ALL THESE ENGINES IN THE RACE ON SUNDAY, YOU ALSO HAVE
THE YATES RACING NAME ASSOCIATED WITH A TEAM AGAIN IN FRONT ROW
MOTORSPORTS.  WHAT IS YOUR ROLE IN THAT ORGANIZATION?  "First of all,
it was nice to see what Max Jones and I did with Yates Racing to be
able to carry on the 96 and 98 points could go to Front Row
Motorsports and Bob Jenkins.  What a great story.  NASCAR is really an
opportunity, just like my dad had an opportunity to come in and own a
team Bob Jenkins is getting that now.  He has three cars in the race
and there are 13 Fords in the race, and I think that's the largest car
count Ford has had in quite some time.  It's nice to see those Fusions
out there on the race track and Ford doing so well as a company, but
as far as Bob's role - first and foremost, I'm the engine builder.  If
he needs any advice or wants to bounce anything off me, of course I'm
there, but primarily it's Bob's ship and I'm there when he needs me."

FacebookTwitterMySpaceEmailShare/Bookmark